Glazing Experiments

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Small bowl, formed on the potter´s wheel, fired and glazed

 

I´m sure most of you remember my post concerning the Art of Mastering the Potter´s Wheel about two months ago (if not, just have a quick look here).

Due to the summer holidays and my new job, I had to wait until now to begin with my glazing experiments on the little pieces I made back then.

I call them experiments because I´m mixing two or three different glazes on one piece and don´t know what will happen to them once they are forced to fuse under the enormous temperatures. As you can imagine, it´s always wonderfully exciting to open the hatch of the kiln! 😉

Sometimes these experiments work out just fine, other times one glaze seems to absorp the other completely and you can´t see any difference at all.

 

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For the little bowl you see above and below (it´s always the same one 😉 ) I used two different glazes called “turquoise snowflake” and “strawberry red”.

 

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As you can hopefully see (it´s quite challenging to photograph glazed pottery because of the reflection), both glazes tried to stay dominant but fused at one point or another.

 

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detail of glazed bowl

 

I did the same thing with different glazes on another piece of mine, this time a small vase.

 

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Vase, fired and glazed

 

The effects are always unpredictable.

 

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detail glazed vase

 

I also tried this technique with this cute little elephant one of my students made for me as a present a couple of years ago.

 

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Startled Elephant, fired and glazed

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55 thoughts on “Glazing Experiments

  1. These are great! I love the bowl and vase (especially the bowl 💕💕). I was thinking of you earlier; I went to an exhibition of contemporary Japanese ceramics. I don’t know if you know anything about Japanese pottery, but it is very regional and very different from place to place. Now I’m thinking I need to save like crazy to go to Japan and learn more about it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you sooooo much, Su!!! 🙂 I kind of am also in love with that bowl and can´t stop from staring at it 😉 It has a little mesmerizing effect on me it seems 😉
      Oh, that sounds like an exhibition I would very much like to see, too!! I don´t know much about japanese pottery but I´m sure it will be just perfect and beautiful like so many other things the Japanese do. And I would also love to go there one day! Guess, I´ll also have to start saving too 😉 Have a beautiful weekend! xxxxxxxxx ❤

      Liked by 1 person

      • I can understand that Sarah. You must feel really good not just to own something so beautiful, but to know that you made it. I’d be willing to get clay on my hands (which you know I HATE) if I thought I could make a bowl like that.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hi Su! I’m so sorry that it took me so long to reply to your lovely comment! Thank you so much for the compliment and the understanding bit (which kind of is the more important one to me, although I don’t mind the first at all 😉 ) Having seen so many of your art works – be it photographs, cakes or bags 😉 – I’m totally convinced that you would excell at working with clay!!! 🙂 I really need to work out how to make clay less cumbersome to work with so that you can join me 😀 Wish you a very beautiful weekend! 🙂 xxxxxxxxx ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      • No problem. How is work going? I love the results of working with clay, and have found that I don’t mind polymer clay. It’s not much good for bowls, vases, etc. but pretty good for sculpting and jewellery. So many things to play with, so little time. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Too true! There are always so many ideas what one can do and never enough time to get them all done!! 🙂
        I think I once did work with polymer clay when I was little, but don´t remember how it felt… but if it works well with doing a little sculpting and jewellery that just sounds perfect to me 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • 🙂 I used to always think of polymer clay as a “kid thing”. The boy-child and I spent a bit of time making christmas decorations and stuff when he was little. But I’ve now discovered there is this huge community of serious artists who use it to make totally awesome things. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Sarah! This sweet bowl is precious! Are you familiar with the Southwestern color pattern of red and turquoise? This so reminds me of it, and I was thrilled when I learned the names of the hues….strawberry red and turquoise snowflake.

    You are well on your way to inspiring me to take another pottery class this fall! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    • Aww – thank you soooooo much, Melissa! 🙂 I’m so glad you like it! 🙂 I think I’ve seen something like what you’ve mentioned, but didn’t know it was a particular color pattern in the south west of the U.S. Thank you for pointing that one out to me, I’ll make sure to make some research! (which I just happen to love doing 😉 ) oh, and how lovely it would be if I’ve inspired you to do another class! Please, please do one and then share your bound-to-be beautiful results!!! 🙂 Wish you a perfect weekend! xxxxx

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